1. Return of the One-Armed Swordsman (1969):

Sequel drops the original’s melodrama in favor of a tournament and clan warfare. Insanely high body count. Solid, but definitely prefer the first.

    Return of the One-Armed Swordsman (1969):

    Sequel drops the original’s melodrama in favor of a tournament and clan warfare. Insanely high body count. Solid, but definitely prefer the first.

     
  2. 16:00 20th Jun 2014

    Notes: 348

    Reblogged from tinycartridge

    tinycartridge:

    Whoa, a new infinite 1-up trick for Super Mario Bros. ⊟

    It’s E3 week, so expect lots of news from the bleeding edge of video game technology, like this amazing 1-up trick in Super Mario Bros., by S Haya (via Famicom no Neta). I can’t imagine the combination of virtuoso-level playing, tool-assisted replaying, and ingenuity that led someone to finally hit upon this method. Skip to 2:40 to see it in action!

    Here’s how it works: start a two-player game in “hard mode,” die as Mario in 1-2, get to 5-2 as Luigi, die to a Hammer Bro while climbing a hidden vine, drop back into 1-2 as Mario, climb the bugged vine, and smack Buzzy Beetles a million times for easy 1-ups. Famicom no Neta’s Google-translated post calls this technique “violent buttocks.”

    The best part is that if you have the skill to pull this thing off, you definitely don’t need any extra lives.

    SUPPORT TINY CARTRIDGE Join Club Tiny!
     
  3. Ugesh Sarkar’s Third Degree (2008?):

Street magic TV show from India featuring the Master of Unusual constantly offering to freak people out/up. Really highlights the importance of high energy reaction shots in, say, David Blaine’s shows. Most of the marks are more bemused than amazed. 

Not recommended, but on Netflix streaming for some reason.

    Ugesh Sarkar’s Third Degree (2008?):

    Street magic TV show from India featuring the Master of Unusual constantly offering to freak people out/up. Really highlights the importance of high energy reaction shots in, say, David Blaine’s shows. Most of the marks are more bemused than amazed.

    Not recommended, but on Netflix streaming for some reason.

     
  4. License to Kill (1989):

Not into the drug dealer-chasing Bonds. Feels really of its time with Bond turning in his badge and going rogue. I like 80s cop movies just fine, but its not what I want from Bond.

    License to Kill (1989):

    Not into the drug dealer-chasing Bonds. Feels really of its time with Bond turning in his badge and going rogue. I like 80s cop movies just fine, but its not what I want from Bond.

     
  5. Still Walking (2008)

A family reunites on the 15th anniversary of the eldest son’s drowning. 

Not as bleak as it sounds, much warmer. A scene with the man saved by the son begging for forgiveness is way too broad and really disrupts the flow. Still dug this one.

    Still Walking (2008)

    A family reunites on the 15th anniversary of the eldest son’s drowning.

    Not as bleak as it sounds, much warmer. A scene with the man saved by the son begging for forgiveness is way too broad and really disrupts the flow. Still dug this one.

     
  6. Cat People (1982):
Watched two halved of this about a month apart, so memories are pretty hazy. I can still comfortably say I’d take the original any day; the remake fills in a lot of gaps that don’t need to be (though it adds Bowie). 

    Cat People (1982):

    Watched two halved of this about a month apart, so memories are pretty hazy. I can still comfortably say I’d take the original any day; the remake fills in a lot of gaps that don’t need to be (though it adds Bowie). 

     
  7. Statues Also Die (1958):

    Argues for/demonstrates the failures of divorcing art/craft from its context.

     
  8. You’re Next (2011/2013):
This was a total bust. I might have better luck in the theater where the comedy probably worked better; watching at home I couldn’t wrap my head around who was supposed to be annoying and who was supposed to be funny because they’re annoying.
Not really a good horror recipe for me.

    You’re Next (2011/2013):

    This was a total bust. I might have better luck in the theater where the comedy probably worked better; watching at home I couldn’t wrap my head around who was supposed to be annoying and who was supposed to be funny because they’re annoying.

    Not really a good horror recipe for me.

     
  9. Django Unchained (2012): 
Really wish Tarantino would transition to doing smaller movies. I would’ve liked this much more as a Zatoichi-style ongoing series. Maybe not fair, but couldn’t really shake that feeling. As is it felt both rushed an overstuffed, and through no fault of theirs Waltz blows Foxx off the screen.

    Django Unchained (2012): 

    Really wish Tarantino would transition to doing smaller movies. I would’ve liked this much more as a Zatoichi-style ongoing series. Maybe not fair, but couldn’t really shake that feeling. As is it felt both rushed an overstuffed, and through no fault of theirs Waltz blows Foxx off the screen.

     
  10. Villano IV vs. Blue Demon Jr. (4/19/14):

    This wasn’t a patch on the Chessman match from a couple weeks ago, but still my favorite from a slow week. Some fun matwork before Demon starts stumbling.